Return to Cardamom Blog Tour

Return to Cardamom Blog Tour

About Return to Cardamom

Return to Cardamom by Julie Anne Grasso Title: Return to Cardamom (Caramel Cardamom Trilogy, Book #2)

Author: Julie Anne Grasso

Publisher: Independent

Publication Date: July 17, 2013

Pages: 136 (Paperback)

Recommended Age: 9+

Summary:
Life is sweet for Caramel and things are finally getting back to normal. Well, as normal as it can be for a telepathic elf who can train trees and control computers, but she soon finds life on Cardamom is not all cupcakes and apple cider. A saboteur is hiding in the rainforest canopy, and the elves’ precious cardamom export has been wiped out. Caramel is certain it’s another trick of Alexander222 and her Aunt Isabel, but no one will believe her, and the clock is ticking. She must expose the saboteur in time to save the crop or the Elves of Cardamom will lose their livelihood. Caramel won’t rest until her theory is proven. While she is on the hunt, she makes a shocking discovery, one that will change everything.

Purchase

Amazon (US) * Amazon (UK) * Amazon (Canada)

The Buzz About Book 1: Escape From the Forbidden Planet

Escape from the Forbidden Planet by Julie Anne Grasso“Julie Anne Grasso has created an action-packed story featuring a range of interesting and imaginative characters (i.e., elves, the Alexanders, and other creatures), intergalactic travel, advanced medical and scientific technology, and complex environmental and conservation issues. Escape From the Forbidden Planet contains an intricate plot which slowly unfolds until you’re hooked and you are left on the edge of your proverbial seat wondering what will happen next.” ~ Mother Daughter Book Reviews, 5 Stars It’s part geeky, part science, and part fun, all brought together to become this awesome book called Escape From The Forbidden Planet. I would recommend this book to reading age kids and adults who like sci-fi kids books. Definitely something different. I really enjoyed reading it!” ~ Michael S., Amazon, 5 Stars “I loved this book. Super great series for middle graders. I loved Caramel. She has a great attitude and determination. I really admired how she was focused on getting home, saving her family but also made the best of being stuck on an alien planet. Definitely a book with great role models for kids. I really hope there is more to come where this came from. Kids need books like this with catchy stories, solid characters who have good values that they can relate to.” ~ Unorthodox Mama, Goodreads, 5 Stars.

*** Get your FREE COPY of Escape From the Forbidden Planet by Julie Anne Grasso July 17 to 21, 2013. Available for 99 cents after July 21, 2013. ***

Amazon (US) * Amazon (UK) * Amazon (Canada)

About the Author

Julie Grasso - Author Julie Anne Grasso is an Australian author with a background in paediatric nursing. She spent many years literally wrapping children in cotton wool. Every day she witnessed great courage and resilience from the tiny people she cared for, which inspired her to write stories about a little girl elf just like them. Add in some very funky technology, her love of science fiction and desire to impart great values through her little girl elf named Caramel and there you have it, the Adventures of Caramel Cardamom Trilogy was the result. Julie lives in Melbourne with her husband Danny and their little elf Giselle. Most days she can be found sipping chai lattes, chasing a toddler, and dreaming up wonderful worlds that often involve consumption of cupcakes.

Book Website: http://www.julieannegrassobooks.com/

Author Blog: WhenIgrowupIwannawriteakidsbook

Facebook page: Julie Anne Grasso Books

Twitter: @Jujuberry37

Goodreads Author: Julie Anne Grasso

Return to Cardamom Blog Tour Schedule (2013)

July 17

Mother Daughter Book Reviews (Launch & Review)
The Wise Owl Factory Book a Day (Review)
Jemima Pett (Review)

July 18

Amanda’s Books and More (Review)
Tales of a Bookworm (Review)
InkSpired: A Blog (Review)

July 19

Sher-A-Hart (Review)
This Kid Reviews Books (Review)

July 20

Fiona Ingram (Review)
swlothian | author (Review)
A Library Mama (Review)

July 21

Imagineer – ing (Book Spotlight)
Stanley and Katrina (Review)

July 22

Published Bestsellers (Author Interview)
The Jenny Evolution (Review)

July 23

Word Spelunking (Guest Post)
Stitch Says (Author Interview)

July 24

Nik’s Picks Book Reviews (Review)
R.K. Grow- reading.writing.blogging. (Author Interview)
Diane Estrella @That’s What I’m Here For… (Review)

July 25

Guiltless Reading (Review)

July 26

Kid Lit Reviews (Review)
BeachBoundBooks (Review)

July 27

Mel’s Shelves (Review)
Learning and Growing the Piwi Way (Review)

July 28

My Devotional Thoughts (Author Interview)
Daisha Korth Books (Review)

July 29

Fiona Ingram (Author Interview)
Published Bestsellers (Review)
Bookworm for Kids (Review)

July 30

Nayu’s Reading Corner (Guest Post)
Stitch Says (Review)

July 31

Cheryl Carpinello’s Writing Pages (Guest Post)
Nayu’s Reading Corner (Review)
Barbara Ann Mojica’s Blog (Review)

*** Return to Cardamom Blog Tour Giveaway ***

Return to Cardamom by Julie Anne GrassoAmazon $50 Gift Card

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prize:

One winner will receive a copy (print in U.S./Canada & e-copy internationally) + a $50 Amazon gift card or PayPal cash

Contest runs:

July 17th to August 7th, 11:59 pm, 2013

Open:

Worldwide

How to enter:

Enter using the Rafflecopter widget below.

Terms and Conditions:

A winner will be randomly drawn through the Rafflecopter widget and will be contacted by email within 48 hours after the giveaway ends. The winner will then have 72 hours to respond. If the winner does not respond within 72 hours, a new draw will take place for a new winner. If you have any additional questions – feel free to send us an email!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

“A Wet Monday” by Dorothy Edwards: A Review

Note:  This is a review of a book that is currently out of print.

Shame, shame, shame!  Yes indeed. That this little gem from Dorothy Edwards is out of print verges on criminal neglect of a treasure.  We used to read this to our eldest son, and our other two children when they came along, and it was so loved we were all word perfect on it!  In fact, we, and our kids, still quote snippets from it.  No, it’s not a complex story, or life changing or deeply moral. It is, however, something we can al relate to.  As such, that makes it a perfect book for kids, who love familiar things, consistency.  The title says it all – almost.  And, believe it or not, many modern parents could actually learn a secret known to past generations and every child – rain isn’t the end of all fun.  It doesn’t cement you into the home!

This book richly deserves the same notoriety as Dorothy Edwards’ “Naughty Little Sister” tales.  It should be brought back to print without delay!

I would award more if it was possible, but I have to settle for 5 stars!

If you have children or grandchildren, or have any cause to read to children, this is a book well worth getting!  There are copies for sale, through the likes of Amazon.

Recalling the Past

Book Covers - May 2013 Overwhelmed!

A brief note of thanks to Deanie Humphrys-Dunne!  Deanie, who has created some lovely characters for children in her books, did me the great honour of interviewing me for her blog.  Thanks, Deanie!  I don’t know what I’ve done to be featuring on sop many blogs at the moment!!

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Recollections

Yesterday, I was chatting, via email, to Chris, of The Storytelling Ape fame, about children and the books they love.   In fact, as Chris had been kind enough to invite me to make a suggestion or two for his special Kids Korner blog, in terms of books recommended, I was sent into a lengthy reverie.  Emerging from this happy state, I was able to name one book, My Cat Beany by Jane Feder (illustrated by Karen Gundersheimer), which my eldest son adored above all others and which was one of three that I was required to read to him at bedtime, even though we were both word perfect on it!  The other two were A Wet Monday by Dorothy Edwards (famed for her My Naughty Little Sister tales) and, at the right time of the year The Night Before Christmas by Clement Clarke Moore.  In the course of this chat, I recalled not only these three great favourites, particularly for bedtimes, but also something which might seem contradictory to a subject I’ve discussed previously.

When our eldest was still little, Marshall Cavendish released certain partworks.  One was Story Teller and the other was Little Story Teller.  These featured stunningly illustrated stories, old and new, and each issue came with an audio cassette (for those now thoroughly lost, they predated CDs!).  We mortgaged our souls, virtually, to buy Little Story Teller!  We even bought the beautiful, strong, padded plastic covered binders (they could have done with being a bit more able to store the magazines without bulging!) and the equally excellent quality cassette cases.  Why?  Because we acknowledged that our son’s appetite for reading far exceeded the time we could devote to reading to him, especially as his brother and then his sister put in their appearances.  When there was no alternative, he would lie on the floor, on his belly, with an old portable cassette player, listening to tape after tape, and following the tales in the magazines.  I couldn’t begin to guess at how many hours he spent like that!  We also acquired odd issues of Story Teller from charity shops.  Theoretically, they were well beyond his age.  He still consumed them eagerly!  Then, as a result of the chat with Chris, and recalling how our son had fallen in love with a tale about Gobbolino, the Witch’s Cat, I just had to explore a bit.  As a consequence, I came upon a wonderful blog that’s devoted to Story Teller/Little Story Teller!  If you’re an addict of the partworks, or if you’re just curious, please do visit the blog!  There are even some Youtube links for some of the tales from the series.  (My son was thrilled when I sent him the link!)  Partworks are everywhere, these days, but I know of none that represent such excellent value as these old ones.

The aforesaid isn’t a contradiction!  I don’t believe that audiobooks are evil replacements for human interaction!  I simply believe that they must always fit a role in which they are an accessory – something that adds to genuine story times between parents and their children.  I would have been so full of guilt if I had abdicated my responsibility as a father by pushing my children to these cassettes rather than reading to them myself!  Worse, if I had so abdicated, I would have been deprived of very special times. So, my message is, and always will be, that there’s no substitute for parents reading to their children, whenever it is humanly possible!

There’s one final thing I’d like to say about KidLit.  I have, in the past, overheard parents in bookshops who, while browsing impatiently through a plethora of books for kids, that they must find the award winning books!  Why?  Surely, they should be looking for books that they know their child/children will like?  An award winning book on ‘good dental health – essential – educational’ may be a critically acclaimed volume, backed by every possible authority, but it may well not interest children as much as the adventures of a worn out old tractor or a rather less than clever dog!  Personally, I’d rather keep children eager to read than simply ‘well read’ and ‘well informed’.

~ Steve

KidLit Past and Present

A Quick Mention

Yesterday, I posted a poem, “Hey Joey!”.  It’s a little bit of fun – or is it?

KidLit Past and Present

I’m interested in compiling a list of books for children, both those old favourites and modern works.  The list will be divided into age ranges, of course, and I intend to apply a top age of 16 years.  Now, this is where you come in!  I would like this list to not be mine.  I would like it to be a list of recommendations by many.  Below, you’ll find a special contact form.  If you complete the fields in the form, I will add your recommendation to the list.  More, I will include a link to your blog/website!  There are some rules, of course:

  1. I won’t accept any recommendations of your own books!
  2. I won’t accept any link to your own books instead of a link to your blog/website.  For example, an Amazon Author page is fine, but not an Amazon book page!  Facebook pages are okay, but only if they are proper pages, not personal profiles.
  3. You may opt out of providing a blog/website link but you must allow the inclusion of your name!  You may provide either a real or ‘pen’ name.
  4. Out of print books may be recommended but this status must be mentioned.

Please be careful!  Please only include genuine children’s books!

Finally, please only use the comments on this post for actual comments.  Please don’t put your recommendations there instead of using the form!

Thank you all.

~ Steve

The Child and Books

reading poster It’s inescapable.  There is nothing quite like the moment a child opens a book for the first time.  They discover with eyes and mind a magic that is fresh and new.  If they’re lucky, they make the discovery at home, with a book gifted to them.  And it should be a real book, specially produced for children.  I’m inclined to say that it should also be  something more than just any book.  I still remember some of the books I encountered as a child, and believe me when I say that that was a very long time ago.  I won’t list titles.  They’re not important to this discussion.  It’s the sensations that they gave rise to.

A book, with a hard cover, a brightly illustrated jacket protecting a surprisingly plain cover.  The jacket entices, hints at wonders to be discovered within.  The plain cover, in time, will give rise to a sense of immensity, with its blocked typeface so stylishly perfect on front and spine, with maybe a box around the title on the front and lines dividing the printing on the spine.  And opening the book, there’s an aroma that will become so important.  The scent of paper and ink, but much more than just those – the distinctive smell that says “book”.  Within, the text is clear and crisp, with some pages adorned with line drawings, maybe even some colour plates illustrating parts of the contents.  Some books may even have text on pages alive with colourful images, almost like subtitles.

Plunging into the words, the child is immersed in a magical ocean.  It may be a fairy tale or an adventure story, tales of lands of wonder and mystery, stories of ancient times, or more mundane things that any child can relate to.  It really doesn’t matter.  For now, the child loves to enter the enchanted world of books.

The author clearly bears a great responsibility.  These young minds are wide open, thirsty for knowledge.  It is the author’s duty to not bring harm to those minds, not to repel the child.  The author must entertain, first and foremost.  Any other purpose must be subtle, an almost subliminal message.  But, the author isn’t the only person who bears a grave responsibility here.  Parents and teachers must shoulder the burden too.  They must be prepared to provide the books, and to accept that the child may not like some of them.  The worst thing adults do to children is forcing them to read books they dislike!  That single act can stop a child from ever becoming a reader.  It’s a kind of deprival that is inexcusable.

There are far too many children in this world who have no access to books, by the circumstance of where they live or the poverty they exist in.  It is unforgivable for us to deprive our children of the magic world of books and reading.  Even if you aren’t a reader, I beg you to give your children every chance of becoming one.

~ Steve