Book Promo Day: 22nd August, 2013

Astonished!

I am truly astonished, and not a little disappointed, to be honest.  I have received a total of ONE submission for this week’s Book Promo Day!  Given that this is free advertising, I really don’t understand why authors don’t leap at the opportunity.  In future, if I receive anything less than three submissions, the event simply won’t happen that week.  Any that have been received will be carried over until such time as three or more entries will be possible.

So as not to disappoint Alex Shaw on this occasion, I have added two books myself!  I believe that these will be of interest and I hope that you will understand why I’ve done this.

===0===

Cold Black by Alex Shaw

Former SAS trooper Aidan Snow returns in the thrilling follow up to the Kindle bestseller ‘Hetman’.

Now an MI6 operative, Snow must locate and rescue an old SAS colleague before an Al-Qaeda splinter cell can carry out acts of unprecedented horror. But who is covertly funding these new attacks and why?

Abduction

Veteran SAS trooper, Paddy Fox has lost his job, his wife and his temper. Whilst bitterly job hunting, Fox witnesses a car crash and finds himself rescuing a kidnapped Saudi Royal. Persuaded by MI6 to accept a job as security adviser in Saudi Arabia, Fox travels to Riyadh.

Assassination

In Kyiv, a director of the Belorussian KGB is gunned down whilst trying to pass shocking intelligence to his counterpart in the Ukrainian SBU. Intelligence, which if verified, sets out plans to commit international acts of terror.

Al-Qaeda

In Saudi Arabia, an entire British Trade mission is taken hostage by a new, highly trained, group aligned to Al-Qaeda. But who is covertly funding this new insurgency and why?

An International Conspiracy

Former SAS Trooper turned MI6 operative, Aidan Snow is caught in a maelstrom involving East, West and Middle East which endangers the world’s supply of oil.

More information:

http://amzn.com/B00408A6C0


Shade of Evil (Being Part 1 of G1: The Guardians) by Steve K Smy

The 2nd edition with a dramatic new cover, with an illustration by Chris Graham.  Some fundamental changes have been made to the novelette’s story, particularly in respect of the Guardians.

A simple man bears a terrible burden, unknowing. Now, that burden is killing him, seeking freedom from his exhausted hulk. Freedom to satisfy its evil hunger.  And its food is Humans!

A darkness dwelt there, a vile miasma of misery that gnawed at the very soul of the man. It had been there for years, growing like some parasite, growing bloated with every bit of melancholy that was sucked from him. Worse, it was taking on a life of its own, a substance that should not exist. And the man was becoming something less, something hollow.

More information:

Author’s website/blog


Yule Pause and Frosty Claus (The Owl Wood Publications) by Ian Hutson

Yule pause and Frosty Claus is the second of The Owl Wood Publications and tells the story of two dogs, Pipsqueak and Toby, an owl who’s a hit-man left over from the Cold War, four chickens of dubious IQ, several of the bravest pheasant you’ll ever meet – and a monastery populated by little rat monks with little rat tonsures and little rat sandals. Father Christmas gets his just deserts and the rats get the Harrods Christmas Hamper. All is well that ends well, and this all ends well.

No sex, very little violence and none of that “Hollywood style” and only a hint of the mildest of everyday English gentlefolk cussing.
15,000 words or thereabouts allowing for the cold. More words than you could shake a stick at.

The Owl Wood is a real-life tiny patch of woodland set aside in Lincolnshire, England, for owls to nest and do owlish things. Since the miserable little souls have steadfastly refused to nest for the past five years I rather thought I ought to make up some action instead. Blathering nonsense, but fun.

Why not have a look at the others in the series too while you’re at it? There are sheep in the next one. Sheep I tell you, lovely sheeeeeeep.

More information:

http://www.amazon.com/Ian-Hutson/e/B00C6XFRBG


Advertisements

WIPs and Memories

WIPping up a Storm!

Yeah, I know!  Terrible!  But this little paragraph is about, shockingly, WIPs.  Though circumstances forced a stall, I am working on a new book.  It will be the fifth  in the G1: The Guardians series.  It has a slightly different atmosphere to the other stories.  I decided that there was a serious risk of things becoming just ‘more of the same’, so the new tale has some very different elements, including multiple threads and some nods to European folklore and even some Christian myths.  As to more immediate WIPs, the soon-to-be-released novel is progressing well in the preparations for printing, and Shade of Evil is already heading to the final proof stage with the printers.  There’s good reason to hope that the novel will be available in both paperback and hardback print editions on the launch date!

A Memory of a Wonderful Series

Back in the 1970s, The Hamlyn Publishing Group produced a lovely set of books – the Hamlyn all-colour paperbacks.  Now, before anybody who remembers them jumps all over me, I know that the binding quality was absolutely awful, and you were liable to end up with a set of loose-leaf books!  No, for me, what made these books so special was the range of subjects and the first class colour illustrations.  I had numerous books in the series, ranging from animals to geology, from Budgerigars to guns!  As one of hose kids more inclined to learn by self-education at home, or out and about, the books were an invaluable resource.  And, most important of all, they were affordable.  The books were all written by experts but in an interesting way, without being overtly educational or, vitally, condescending.

~ Steve

What a Shame!

Blog Browser Day

It strikes me as being a shame that nobody nominated any blogs for Blog Browser Day this week.  To me, this opportunities to bring the spotlight of free advertising to bear are priceless.  Okay, so this one is really intended to direct folk to blogs that we, ourselves, like, but I would have thought that there’s no shortage of those!  Please, my friends!  Don’t be shy about these chances!

What the…?

Those of you who follow me on Facebook too will know about this.  My feelings are, however, still strong on the whole thing!

Yesterday, while doing a quick check on my Smashwords Dashboard, I discovered a whole bunch of my books had been taken off “Premium”!  Now, that setting means that the books can and are sent to numerous other online bookstores.  A very desirable state of affairs, of course.  So removing books from it is devastating!  But why?  Well, all but one had, according to the Smashwords ‘autovetter’, a very, very tiny fault.  Now hang on!  I was under the impression that this system was part of the initial submission process for books.  All of these books have been available for several months!  So why did this happen?  I’d love to know but, to be honest, the folk handling such questions at Smashwords get very defensive and I’m really in no mood for such nonsense.  Suffice it to say that it took me bout 11 hours to make the amendments!

On a Very Much Happier Note…

I was delighted to discover that my short story, Skylord, had received another 5 star review!  It’s on Smashwords (yes, that same place) but I repeat it here:

Skylord is a short story depicting the plight of a young dragon nearing adulthood who is testing his mettle. When he flies too close to Ydren and makes an enemy of her, he tells his parents a lie about their encounter. There is an overabundance of dragons and not enough open territory. His lie leads his parents to go to war over territory. When Skylord learns that he cannot fly in the Phalanx and do battle because he is not yet an adult, he despairs that others will die and he cannot right his wrong. He flies off to the Lost Caverns and meets Belarth, a wise old dragon long presumed to be dead. Belarth gives him some valuable advice which gives Skylord the answer to the problem for which he as been searching. Great adventure fantasy for children ages ten and up.

Barbara Mojica on Aug. 16, 2013 : starstarstarstarstar

Thank you so much, Barbara!

And Finally…

Apart from being able to get the brand new ebook version of Shade of Evil from Smashwords or any Amazon store, with the great new cover by Chris Graham, the 2nd Edition paperback is being prepared right now.  In addition, my new novel is with skoobebooks and will, hopefully, be available in paperback by the launch date of 10th September.  In fact, and this is very exciting, it may also be available in hardback!  The ebook will be processed on the launch date, simultaneously at Amazon and Smashwords.

More exciting news:  I have an artist friend looking into producing illustrations and a new cover for Skylord!  The illustrated version, a fully fledged children’s book, will, I’m afraid, not be available as a free ebook, and the text only version will be withdrawn at the end of this month.  This will reflect the additional work involved in producing an illustrated book.  I will do all I can to keep the price down but ebooks generally can’t be priced below $0.99 USD.

~ Steve

Press Release: Clive the Magic Camel – A Guest Post

clip_image002.jpgclip_image004.pngClive the Magic Camel
– At the Zoo

Clive the Magic Camel – At the Zoo is a very old story about a camel that meets various animals and wishes for one of each of their attributes that he thinks will improve his personality. The name ‘camel’ changes as each attribute is added until he becomes so absurd that he realises that he was better as he was, and not something/somebody else.

The book is written to be read by 6 year olds and upwards, but it can be read to, or told as a story to, children from the age 3 upwards. This book, based on an old nonsense fun story, can even be enjoyed by those in secondary school. It can be read to groups of children to aid discussion on the subject raised.

The story was told certainly in Victorian times when there was no or very little entertainment in the homes. The writer has been telling this and other stories for many years to children and young people of all ages in schools, churches, and youth organisations.

A few years ago the author was told he ought to write down his stories and he has written Clive the Magic Camel – At the Zoo as his first book.

The book was published by Diverze Publications and was released on 14th February 2013.

The book is available in Stroud at ‘The Children’s Bookshop’, Union Street, ‘The Centre Bookshop’, London Road, and at ‘Come into the Light’ High Street, Stonehouse.

It is also available online at: www.diverze.com, www.amazon.co.uk, www.waterstones.com, etc.

Comments on the book (most recent first):

· Sarah, Milford VA, USA (Goodreads)

I have an 8 and a 9 year old daughters. They read the book together and they really enjoyed reading it. They had so much fun sounding out the animals name.

This would be a great book for the author to present at a school and read to students and celebrate everyone’s differences. We had a local author come to our school that did that and the children loved it. This is the perfect book for such a presentation and for children to learn about writing. I look forward to checking out more books from the author.

· Mary Jane Calara, London (FaceBook):

“Great book, the moral lesson is not just for children but for grown- ups too. Proud to have one! Thanks Clive Dale!”

· Janet O’Shea, St Ives (Facebook):

Nina, Morgan, Finley and Aidan really enjoyed this book. It was funny when mummy couldn’t pronounce the words! We are looking forward to reading Clive the Camel at the Seaside.

· Colin Morgan, Bristol (Diverze):

Great story with brilliant illustrations. My grandchildren ages 7 and 9 just loves Clive the Camel they think he is so cute. Hope the next adventure is just as good.

· Current rating on Goodreads is 4.75 out of a maximum 5.

Cotswold Life Magazine, August 2013
selected for an article on children’s books

Cotswold Life Cover Article Cotswold Life

More of Clive Dale’s Books in the Pipeline

Written, proofread and awaiting illustration and publication:

Clive the Magic Camel – At the Seaside
Johnny and the Rice Pudding

Being Written:

Ollie the Onion
Grub the Dog

About the author Clive Dale

Clive currently lives in Stroud, and has worked in the computer departments for various companies including: Purnells, Paulton; Rank Xerox, Mitcheldean; Brann Direct Marketing, Cirencester; and British Energy (now EDF) Gloucester while living in the West Country.

Someone told him he should write his stories down and get them published. ‘Clive the Magic Camel – at the Zoo’ is the first to be published, with ‘Johnny and the Rice Pudding’ and ‘Clive the Magic Camel – at the Seaside’ currently awaiting illustrations.

Clive is now retired and is able to find time to write his stories. He is a member of Ebley Chapel, and a Trustee of the Countess of Huntingdon Connexion. On 2nd April 2013, he was inducted as President of the Countess of Huntingdon Connexion for a two year term.

For over forty years he has been a leader in various children’s and youth organisations (mainly Boys’ Brigade) and has told his stories in those organisations, schools, and Sunday Schools.

He was invited to Longney School, Gloucester on 7th March 2013 for World Book Day when he told the story to four classes and answered their questions on writing a book.

Ben Gander his illustrator for the first book is an avid artist, having produced various murals for children’s bedrooms, a pub and a toyshop, as well as selling various cartoons, caricatures and portraits

clip_image006Contact Information:

Clive Dale
Website: www.dales-tales.com

More Useful Links:

www.facebook.com/clivesDalesTales
www.facebook.com/clive.dale
www.facebook.com/pages/Clive-the-Magic-Camel
www.pinterest.com/clivemdale/
www.goodreads.com/author/show/7035116.Clive_Dale
www.twitter.com/C_DalesTales
www.twitter.com/clivemdale
www.twitter.com/CliveTheMagicc

Recalling the Past

Book Covers - May 2013 Overwhelmed!

A brief note of thanks to Deanie Humphrys-Dunne!  Deanie, who has created some lovely characters for children in her books, did me the great honour of interviewing me for her blog.  Thanks, Deanie!  I don’t know what I’ve done to be featuring on sop many blogs at the moment!!

=0=

Recollections

Yesterday, I was chatting, via email, to Chris, of The Storytelling Ape fame, about children and the books they love.   In fact, as Chris had been kind enough to invite me to make a suggestion or two for his special Kids Korner blog, in terms of books recommended, I was sent into a lengthy reverie.  Emerging from this happy state, I was able to name one book, My Cat Beany by Jane Feder (illustrated by Karen Gundersheimer), which my eldest son adored above all others and which was one of three that I was required to read to him at bedtime, even though we were both word perfect on it!  The other two were A Wet Monday by Dorothy Edwards (famed for her My Naughty Little Sister tales) and, at the right time of the year The Night Before Christmas by Clement Clarke Moore.  In the course of this chat, I recalled not only these three great favourites, particularly for bedtimes, but also something which might seem contradictory to a subject I’ve discussed previously.

When our eldest was still little, Marshall Cavendish released certain partworks.  One was Story Teller and the other was Little Story Teller.  These featured stunningly illustrated stories, old and new, and each issue came with an audio cassette (for those now thoroughly lost, they predated CDs!).  We mortgaged our souls, virtually, to buy Little Story Teller!  We even bought the beautiful, strong, padded plastic covered binders (they could have done with being a bit more able to store the magazines without bulging!) and the equally excellent quality cassette cases.  Why?  Because we acknowledged that our son’s appetite for reading far exceeded the time we could devote to reading to him, especially as his brother and then his sister put in their appearances.  When there was no alternative, he would lie on the floor, on his belly, with an old portable cassette player, listening to tape after tape, and following the tales in the magazines.  I couldn’t begin to guess at how many hours he spent like that!  We also acquired odd issues of Story Teller from charity shops.  Theoretically, they were well beyond his age.  He still consumed them eagerly!  Then, as a result of the chat with Chris, and recalling how our son had fallen in love with a tale about Gobbolino, the Witch’s Cat, I just had to explore a bit.  As a consequence, I came upon a wonderful blog that’s devoted to Story Teller/Little Story Teller!  If you’re an addict of the partworks, or if you’re just curious, please do visit the blog!  There are even some Youtube links for some of the tales from the series.  (My son was thrilled when I sent him the link!)  Partworks are everywhere, these days, but I know of none that represent such excellent value as these old ones.

The aforesaid isn’t a contradiction!  I don’t believe that audiobooks are evil replacements for human interaction!  I simply believe that they must always fit a role in which they are an accessory – something that adds to genuine story times between parents and their children.  I would have been so full of guilt if I had abdicated my responsibility as a father by pushing my children to these cassettes rather than reading to them myself!  Worse, if I had so abdicated, I would have been deprived of very special times. So, my message is, and always will be, that there’s no substitute for parents reading to their children, whenever it is humanly possible!

There’s one final thing I’d like to say about KidLit.  I have, in the past, overheard parents in bookshops who, while browsing impatiently through a plethora of books for kids, that they must find the award winning books!  Why?  Surely, they should be looking for books that they know their child/children will like?  An award winning book on ‘good dental health – essential – educational’ may be a critically acclaimed volume, backed by every possible authority, but it may well not interest children as much as the adventures of a worn out old tractor or a rather less than clever dog!  Personally, I’d rather keep children eager to read than simply ‘well read’ and ‘well informed’.

~ Steve